The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

Your Silence will not protect You.

Audre Lorde

Your Silence will not protect You.

Audre Lorde

Feeling like Chicago right now. #KC #WIND #Illinois

Shows Over.

Lupita Nyong’o

Lupita Nyong’o

ON THIS DAY, 16 JANUARY IN 1961, ONE OF AFRICA’S GREATEST SONS, PATRICE LUMUMBA, WAS ASSASSINATED WHILE RESISTING BELGIAN COLONIALISM IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO. 
(Global African Presence)

ON THIS DAY, 16 JANUARY IN 1961, ONE OF AFRICA’S GREATEST SONS, PATRICE LUMUMBA, WAS ASSASSINATED WHILE RESISTING BELGIAN COLONIALISM IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO.
(Global African Presence)

2 notes 

***REPARATIONS***
On this date in 1989, House Resolution (H.R.) 40 was brought before the 1st Session of the 105th Congress.

John Conyers, Black Democrat from Michigan, presented it in the House of Representatives, the first formal attempt to obtain reparations to compensate African-Americans for slavery since Reconstruction. This act was cited as the “Commission to Study Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act.”

Briefly, H.R. 40 read as follows: “To acknowledge the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the United States and the 13 American colonies between 1619 and 1865 and to establish a commission to examine the institution of slavery, subsequently de jure and de facto racial and economic discrimination against African-Americans, and the impact of these forces on living African-Americans, to make recommendations to the Congress on appropriate remedies, and for other purposes.”

H.R. 40 had eight (8) sections in its full text. The last section (8) appropriated $8,000,000 as the price for finding out the extent of reparations.

Reference:
Historic U.S. Cases 1690-1993:
An Encyclopedia New York
Copyright 1992 Garland Publishing, New York
ISBN 0-8240-4430-4

***REPARATIONS***
On this date in 1989, House Resolution (H.R.) 40 was brought before the 1st Session of the 105th Congress.

John Conyers, Black Democrat from Michigan, presented it in the House of Representatives, the first formal attempt to obtain reparations to compensate African-Americans for slavery since Reconstruction. This act was cited as the “Commission to Study Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act.”

Briefly, H.R. 40 read as follows: “To acknowledge the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the United States and the 13 American colonies between 1619 and 1865 and to establish a commission to examine the institution of slavery, subsequently de jure and de facto racial and economic discrimination against African-Americans, and the impact of these forces on living African-Americans, to make recommendations to the Congress on appropriate remedies, and for other purposes.”

H.R. 40 had eight (8) sections in its full text. The last section (8) appropriated $8,000,000 as the price for finding out the extent of reparations.

Reference:
Historic U.S. Cases 1690-1993:
An Encyclopedia New York
Copyright 1992 Garland Publishing, New York
ISBN 0-8240-4430-4

I just opened for UMAR JOHNSON.
#KWANZAA
IMANI = FAITH
2014 is Progress.
END OF OPPRESSION/RACISM/
POVERTY/MISEDUCATION

Just READ 
The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson (1933) for the 1st Time. WIDE AWOKE! 

In 1926 Woodson pioneered  the celebration of “Negro History Week” which eventually became Black History Month. #GARVEY 
#black #RBG #Africa

Just READ
The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson (1933) for the 1st Time. WIDE AWOKE!

In 1926 Woodson pioneered the celebration of “Negro History Week” which eventually became Black History Month. #GARVEY
#black #RBG #Africa

"D.E.E.P. you wanna go D.E.E.P. 
I’ll take ya D.E.E.P.
You know you fucked up when you let my mind creep
Deeper than the page of a book let me look
You let me hit the stage now I got my folks hooked like D.E.E.P.” KAST

"D.E.E.P. you wanna go D.E.E.P.
I’ll take ya D.E.E.P.
You know you fucked up when you let my mind creep
Deeper than the page of a book let me look
You let me hit the stage now I got my folks hooked like D.E.E.P.” KAST

BEFORE THE 1960s INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS CAME UNDER THE FLORA AND FAUNA ACT. THIS MEANT THAT THEY WERE NOT CONSIDERED HUMAN AND IT WAS THEREFORE NOT A CRIME TO KILL THEM. IT WAS NOT UNTIL JANUARY 1967 THAT ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIANS WERE DEEMED HUMAN BY THE AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT. Via SISTER LUANA SANDERS (Global African Presence) #Garvey #Alkebulan #Africa #RBG

BEFORE THE 1960s INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS CAME UNDER THE FLORA AND FAUNA ACT. THIS MEANT THAT THEY WERE NOT CONSIDERED HUMAN AND IT WAS THEREFORE NOT A CRIME TO KILL THEM. IT WAS NOT UNTIL JANUARY 1967 THAT ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIANS WERE DEEMED HUMAN BY THE AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT. Via SISTER LUANA SANDERS (Global African Presence) #Garvey #Alkebulan #Africa #RBG

6 notes 

If y’all missed out on the happenings in AFRICA #Alkebulan

If y’all missed out on the happenings in AFRICA #Alkebulan

2 notes 

GREAT AFRICAN FREEDOM FIGHTERS : NZINGHA OF NDONGO (1562-1663), By RUNOKO RASHIDI

Few in history have waged a greater resistance to enslavement than Nzingha of Ndongo. According to Dr. John Henrik Clarke, speaking of Nzingha, “Africa has known no greater patriot.” Nzingha, often referred to as Queen Nzingha or Ann N’zingha, was from Central Africa and spent the last forty years of her life fighting the European forces, particularly the Portuguese, who were trying to enslave whole people of the center of Africa. The fact that she was a woman gives us further cause to celebrate her as here we will not give Black women a subordinate status to Black men. We celebrate our heroes and our sheroes. Today, Nzingha is the national figure of the nation of Angola. She was truly a great African freedom fighter!

GREAT AFRICAN FREEDOM FIGHTERS : NZINGHA OF NDONGO (1562-1663), By RUNOKO RASHIDI

Few in history have waged a greater resistance to enslavement than Nzingha of Ndongo. According to Dr. John Henrik Clarke, speaking of Nzingha, “Africa has known no greater patriot.” Nzingha, often referred to as Queen Nzingha or Ann N’zingha, was from Central Africa and spent the last forty years of her life fighting the European forces, particularly the Portuguese, who were trying to enslave whole people of the center of Africa. The fact that she was a woman gives us further cause to celebrate her as here we will not give Black women a subordinate status to Black men. We celebrate our heroes and our sheroes. Today, Nzingha is the national figure of the nation of Angola. She was truly a great African freedom fighter!